INTROVERTED EXCAVATOR

Also known for The Flinstone Flop
seattlish:

Photo by Joe Ruiz via Flickr
Are you taking the day off? This dude is; as part of the tradition of labor and rest, Labor Day is the one day each year when the Hammering Man statue stands still. 
Also, if you’ve never read the artists’ statement about the Hammering Man by artist Jonathan Borofsky, you should do that today.
“The Hammering Man is a worker. The Hammering Man celebrates the worker. He or she is the village craftsman, the South African coal miner, the computer operator, the farmer or the aerospace worker-the people who produce the commodities on which we depend…I want this work to communicate to all the people of Seattle-not just the artists, but families, young and old. I would hope that children who see theHammering Man at work would connect their delight with the potential mysteries that a museum could offer them in their future.
At its heart, society reveres the worker. The Hammering Man is the worker in all of us.”
Read the whole thing here (the statement appears to be with citation because, after quite an internet rabbit hole exploration, it seems to have originally been hosted on the SAM website but, after a makeover, was never reinstated, which is kind of a shame) and think about what a huge year it’s been for the laborers here at home and how much more there is to come.
Happy Labor Day, all. 

seattlish:

Photo by Joe Ruiz via Flickr

Are you taking the day off? This dude is; as part of the tradition of labor and rest, Labor Day is the one day each year when the Hammering Man statue stands still. 

Also, if you’ve never read the artists’ statement about the Hammering Man by artist Jonathan Borofsky, you should do that today.

The Hammering Man is a worker. The Hammering Man celebrates the worker. He or she is the village craftsman, the South African coal miner, the computer operator, the farmer or the aerospace worker-the people who produce the commodities on which we depend…I want this work to communicate to all the people of Seattle-not just the artists, but families, young and old. I would hope that children who see theHammering Man at work would connect their delight with the potential mysteries that a museum could offer them in their future.

At its heart, society reveres the worker. The Hammering Man is the worker in all of us.”

Read the whole thing here (the statement appears to be with citation because, after quite an internet rabbit hole exploration, it seems to have originally been hosted on the SAM website but, after a makeover, was never reinstated, which is kind of a shame) and think about what a huge year it’s been for the laborers here at home and how much more there is to come.

Happy Labor Day, all. 

And yet we still see our family members harassed by police, we still hear and read racist comments, we still watch efforts to dismantle our families and livelihoods under the guise of “civilizing” us, still see efforts to destroy our homelands and watch the law find ways to take even our children. We live in a world where there are people who won’t acknowledge us unless they are trying to convince us our culture exists only to be appropriated. Do we deserve such treatment? No. And yet here we are.

—Alex-jon Earl reflects on the fourth anniversary of the shooting of John T. Williams by SPD officer Ian Birk — and the continued struggle of Seattle’s native population — over on The Urbanist. Read it. (via seattlish)

humansofnewyork:

"What’s the most important thing your dad has ever taught you?""If someone hurts your feelings, don’t worry, because that person will also have a turn to get their feelings hurt. And also, you should never undermine people or make them feel unimportant. And also, if you drop out of school, he won’t deal with you anymore."(Kampala, Uganda

humansofnewyork:

"What’s the most important thing your dad has ever taught you?"
"If someone hurts your feelings, don’t worry, because that person will also have a turn to get their feelings hurt. And also, you should never undermine people or make them feel unimportant. And also, if you drop out of school, he won’t deal with you anymore."

(Kampala, Uganda